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Indicator Center

As part of our commitment to transparency, the Indicators Center includes main sustainability performance indicators of Votorantim Cimentos, including Material Topics & Sustainable Development Goals, Global Reporting Initiative and Global Cement and Concrete Association Charter and Sustainability Accounting Standards Board.

MATERIAL TOPICS & SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS (SDG)

Through the engagement of our stakeholders, we define organization material topics and linked our performance to the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

Climate Change

Description: Impacts from climate change on our operations, greenhouse gas emissions, and strategy for managing CO2 emissions and climate risks

Why it is material to VC?

  • The cement sector is one of the world’s largest emitters of greenhouse gases (GHG) competitiveness
  • Demands and pressures from customers and Society
  • Environmental, reputational and regulatory risks

GRI 305-1: Direct CO2 emissions (scope 1)
Cement 2019 2020 2021¹
Gross absolute CO2 emission (tCO2)  19,027,609  20,421,293 24,877,550
Net absolute CO2 emission (tCO2)  18,280,538  19,630,033 23,999,550
Aggregates 2019 2020 2021
Absolute CO2 emission (tCO2e)  4,943  5,199 5,168
Concrete 2019 2020 2021
Absolute CO2 emission (tCO2e)  16,430  20,455 19,007
Mortar 2019 2020 2021
Absolute CO2 emission (tCO2e) 1,853 1,674 1,563
Cal e Lime and agricultural inputs  2019 2020 2021
Absolute CO2 emission (tCO2e)  156,781  184,422 194,582
Total – Scope 1  19,207,615 20,633,043  25,097,870
Biogenic emissions – Scope 1 (tCO2)  1,189,082  1,322,731 1,524,961

Scope 1 emissions include cement operations in Brazil, VCNA, VCEAA and VCLATAM through a consolidation approach. Emissions from the Cement business were calculated considering the GCCA guidelines for calculating the sector’s CO2 emissions. Emissions from other businesses were calculated considering the guidelines of the Brazilian GHG Protocol Program. The gases included in the calculation for scope 1 were: CO2, CH4, N2O.
¹Increase due to a change in scope and the acquisition of two new cement operations (McInnis and Balboa), which are still at a lower level of thermal substitution and clinker factor, in addition to reduced thermal substitution in some regions due to limited access to waste caused by the pandemic in a time of increased cement production.

GRI 305-2: Indirect CO2 emissions (scope 2)
Indirect CO2 emissions – Scope 2 (tCO2) 2019 2020 2021¹
Cement  660,573  532,913 771,610
Concrete 230 190 429
Aggregates 772  270 1,130
Mortar 595 469 574
Lime and agricultural inputs 3,569 3,092 6,333
Total – Scope 2  665,739 536,934 780,076

Scope 2 activities consider emissions related to electricity purchased by Brazilian operations and VCNA, VCEAA and VCLatam cement operations.
¹Increase due to a change in scope and the acquisition of two new cement operations (McInnis and Balboa).

GRI 305-3: Other indirect emissions (scope 3)
Other indirect emissions – Scope 3 (tCO2e) 2019 2020 2021¹
Transportation of inputs and final products  581,035  249,061 5,158,605
Total – Scope 3  581,035  249,061 5,158,605
Biogenic emissions (tCO2)  61,437  30,661 30,297

¹For 2021, we refined our Scope 3 inventory including the emissions from purchased goods and services, fuel and energy related activities, upstream and downstream transportation and distribution. In the last years, the scope 3 considered only transportation and distribution.

GRI 305-4: GHG emission intensity
Cement 2019 2020 2021
Gross specific CO2 emission (kg CO2/t cementitious) 615 599 619
Net specific CO2 emission (kg CO2/t cementitious) 591 576 597
Aggregates 2019 2020 2021
Specific CO2 emission (kgCO2e/t aggregates) 1.30  1.63 1.69
Concrete 2019 2020 2021
Specific CO2 emission (kgCO2e/t concrete) 9.22  11.22 9.42
Mortar 2019 2020 2021
Specific CO2 emission (kgCO2e/t mortar) 2.62  2.42 1.98
Lime and agricultural inputs 2019 2020 2021
Specific CO2 emission (kgCO2e/t lime and agricultural inputs)  75.49  87.78 89.06

Scope 1 emissions include cement operations in Brazil, VCNA, VCEAA and VCLATAM through a consolidation approach. Emissions from the Cement business were calculated considering the GCCA guidelines for calculating the sector’s CO2 emissions. Emissions from other businesses were calculated considering the guidelines of the Brazilian GHG Protocol Program. The gases included in the calculation for scope 1 were: CO2, CH4, N2O.
¹Increase due to a change in scope and the acquisition of two new cement operations (McInnis and Balboa), which are still at a lower level of thermal substitution and clinker factor, in addition to reduced thermal substitution in some regions due to limited access to waste caused by the pandemic in a time of increased cement production.

GRI 305-5: Reduction of GHG emissions
2019 2020 2021 Base year/ denominator
CO2 reduction as a direct result of initiatives (%) 23% 25% 22%  1990

Scope: Global

Innovation and technology

Description: Development of eco-efficient technologies, sustainable products, investment in innovations.

Why it is material to VC?

  • Competitiveness
  • Operational eco-efficiency
  • Solutions for more affordable buildings
  • Financial risk
GRI 305-1: Direct CO2 emissions (scope 1)
Cement 2019 2020 2021
Gross absolute CO2 emission (tCO2)  19,027,609  20,421,293 24,877,550
Net absolute CO2 emission (tCO2)  18,280,538  19,630,033 23,999,550
Aggregates 2019 2020 2021
Absolute CO2 emission (tCO2e)  4,943  5,199 5,168
Concrete 2019 2020 2021
Absolute CO2 emission (tCO2e)  16,430  20,455 19,007
Mortar 2019 2020 2021
Absolute CO2 emission (tCO2e)  1,853  1,674 1,563
Lime and agricultural inputs 2019 2020 2021
Absolute CO2 emission (tCO2e)  156,781  184,422 194,582
Total – Scope 1  19,207,615  20,633,043  25,097,870
Biogenic emissions – Scope 1 (tCO2)  1,189,082  1,322,731 1,524,961

Scope 1 emissions include cement operations in Brazil, VCNA, VCEAA and VCLATAM through a consolidation approach. Emissions from the Cement business were calculated considering the GCCA guidelines for calculating the sector’s CO2 emissions. Emissions from other businesses were calculated considering the guidelines of the Brazilian GHG Protocol Program. The gases included in the calculation for scope 1 were: CO2, CH4, N2O. ¹Increase due to a change in scope and the acquisition of two new cement operations (McInnis and Balboa), which are still at a lower level of thermal substitution and clinker factor, in addition to reduced thermal substitution in some regions due to limited access to waste caused by the pandemic in a time of increased cement production.

GRI 305-2: Indirect CO2 emissions through purchased energy (scope 2)
Indirect CO2 emissions – Scope 2 (tCO2) 2019 2020 2021¹
Cement  660,573  532,913 771,610
Concrete 230 190 429
Aggregates 772 269 1,130
Mortar 595 469 574
Lime and agricultural inputs  3,569  3,092 6,333
Total – Scope 2  665,739  536,934 780,076

Scope 2 activities consider emissions related to electricity purchased by Brazilian operations and VCNA, VCEAA and VCLatam cement operations.
¹Increase due to a change in scope and the acquisition of two new cement operations (McInnis and Balboa).

GRI 305-3: Other indirect emissions (scope 3)
Other indirect emissions – Scope 3 (tCO2e) 2019 2020 2021¹
Transportation of inputs and final products  581,035  249,061 5,158,605
Total – Scope 3  581,035  249,061 5,158,605
Biogenic emissions (tCO2)  61,437  30,661 30,297

¹For 2021, we refined our Scope 3 inventory including the emissions from purchased goods and services, fuel and energy related activities, upstream and downstream transportation and distribution. In the last years, the scope 3 considered only transportation and distribution.

GRI 305-4: GHG emission intensity
Cement 2019 2020 2021¹
Gross specific CO2 emission (kg CO2/t cementitious) 615 599 619
Net specific CO2 emission (kg CO2/t cementitious) 591 576 597
Aggregates 2019 2020 2021
Specific CO2 emission (kgCO2e/t aggregates) 1.30  1.63 1.69
Concrete 2019 2020 2021
Specific CO2 emission (kgCO2e/t concrete) 9.22  11.22 9.42
Mortar 2019 2020 2021
Specific CO2 emission (kgCO2e/t mortar) 2.62  2.42 1.98
Lime and agricultural inputs 2019 2020 2021
Specific CO2 emission (kgCO2e/t lime and agricultural inputs)  75.49  87.78 89.06

Scope 1 emissions include cement operations in Brazil, VCNA, VCEAA and VCLATAM through a consolidation approach. Emissions from the Cement business were calculated considering the GCCA guidelines for calculating the sector’s CO2 emissions. Emissions from other businesses were calculated considering the guidelines of the Brazilian GHG Protocol Program. The gases included in the calculation for scope 1 were: CO2, CH4, N2O.
¹Increase due to a change in scope and the acquisition of two new cement operations (McInnis and Balboa), which are still at a lower level of thermal substitution and clinker factor, in addition to reduced thermal substitution in some regions due to limited access to waste caused by the pandemic in a time of increased cement production.

GRI 305-5: Reduction of GHG emissions
2019 2020 2021 Base year/ denominator
CO2 reduction as a direct result of initiatives (%) 23% 25% 22%  1990

Scope: Global

GRI 305-7: Other air emissions
2019 2020 2021
Number of kilns reported 35 36 39
NOx 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (tonne/year) 39,186 35,385 41,150
Specific emissions (g/tonne clinker) 1,734 1,483 1,394
SOx 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (tonne/year) 16,330 15,918 20,282
Specific emissions (g/tonne clinker) 723 667 687
PM (Dust) 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (tonne /year) 1,318 1,041 1,122
Specific emissions (g/tonne clinker) 58 44 38
Mercury 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (kg/year) 274 200 311
Specific emissions (mg/tonne clinker) 12 8 11
VOC 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (ton/year) 1,413 1,298 3,473
Specific emissions (g/tonne clinker) 63 54 118
Dioxins/Furans 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (mg/year) 2,239 2,866 541
Specific emissions (μg/tonne clinker) 0.10 0.12 0.02
HM1¹ 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (kg/year) 500 324 564
Specific emissions (mg/tonne clinker) 22 14 19
HM2² 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (kg/year) 20,079 16,407 14,022
Specific emissions (mg/tonne clinker) 889 688 475
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) ³ 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (tonne/year) 80
Specific emissions (g/tonne clinker) 0.01
Monitoring data
Overall coverage rate (KPI1) 90% 85% 82%
Coverage rate continuous measurement (KPI2) 100% 100% 100%

Scope: Global
¹HM1: Cadmium and Thallium. ²HM2: Antimony, Arsenic, Lead, Chromium, Cobalt, Copper, Manganese, Nickel, Vanadium. ³Setor average in Spain, extrapolated to Tunisia, Morocco and Turkey. In 2021, we had an increase in emissions in some of the parameters, as result of three factors: higher number of kilns in operation in 2021, compared to 2020; significant increase in clinker production; and significantly higher rate of waste co-processing. KPI1: Monitoring of all pollutants mentioned in the emissions guidelines. KPI2: Monitoring of PM, NOx and SOx.

Responsible relationship with the community

Description: Community autonomy, open dialogue, local community development, local community involvement, impact and value creation.

Why it is material to VC?

  • Solutions that improve the quality of life for families in vulnerable conditions
  • Increase the participation of local suppliers
  • Boost local businesses
  • Social Engagement
GRI 102-41: Collective bargaining agreements
2019 2020 2021
Total number of employees  11,953  11,783 12,466
Employees covered by collective bargaining agreement (%)  9,263  9,358 9,791
Employees covered by collective bargaining agreement (%) 77.5%
79.4%
78.5%

Scope: Global

GRI 102-43: Consumer relations
Net Promoter Score (NPS) survey results 2019 2020 2021
VCBR 73 61 71
VCEAA 36

Scope: VCBR, VCEAA
The indicator can range from -100 to 100.

GRI 413-1: Social Transformation
Operations with implemented local community engagement, impact assessments, and/or development programs 2019 2020 2021
Total number of operations¹ 305 323 336
Number of operations with implemented local community engagement, impact assessments, and/or development programs 124 108 155
Operations with implemented local community engagement, impact assessments, and/or development programs (%) 41% 33% 46%
Global social investment (R$ thousand) 2019 2020 2021
VCBR 14,513.3 7,975.1 8,749.7
VCEAA 1,706.3 2,151.3 1,509.7
VCNA 1,379.5 810.4 1,729.6
VCLATAM 831.3 768.6 725.5
Total 18,430.5 11,705.3 12,714.5

Scope: Global.
¹Total number of sites mapped for the social engagement plan.

Our employee development

Description: Employee diversity and inclusion, employee development and engagement, talent, retention, compensation, preservation of human rights

Why it is material to VC?

  • Maintain qualified professionals to support business growth and efficiency
  • Organizational climate
  • Diversity and inclusion, expression of true self
GRI 102-41: Collective Bargaining Agreements
2019 2020 2021
Total number of employees  11,953  11,783 12,466
Employees covered by collective bargaining agreement  9,263  9,358 9,791
Employees covered by collective bargaining agreement (%) 77.5% 79.4% 78.5%

Scope: Global

GRI 405-1: Diversity
2019 2020 2021
By age group (%) Under 30 years old 30-50 years old Over 50 years old Under 30 years old 30-50 years old Over 50 years old Under 30 years old 30-50 years old Over 50 years old
President/Director 0.0% 48.6% 51.4% 0.0% 38.9% 61.1% 0.0% 40.0% 60.0%
Manager/General Manager 2.1% 75.5% 22.4% 1.0% 72.2% 26.7% 0.2% 72.1% 27.7%
Coordinator/Consultant 10.1% 74.0% 15.9% 5.8% 75.7% 18.5% 5.4% 77.3% 17.3%
Technician/Analyst/Supervisor 17.8% 67.2% 15.1% 15.6% 67.8% 16.6% 15.5% 69.1% 15.5%
Operator 18.9% 59.8% 20.7% 17.1% 59.9% 23.0% 18.4% 60.3% 21.4%
Intern 97.9% 2.1% 0.0% 95.8% 4.2% 0.0% 94.6% 5.4% 0.0%
Apprentice 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 100.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Total employees 22.2% 59.7% 18.1% 18.9% 60.7% 20.5% 19.9% 61.0% 19.1%
Members of governance body (%) 0.0% 38.1% 61.9% 0.0% 38.1% 61.9% 0.0% 23.5% 76.5%
2019 2020 2021
By gender (%) Female Male Female Male Female Male
President/Director 10.8% 89.2% 8.3% 91.7% 7.5% 92.5%
Manager/General Manager 16.8% 83.2% 18.8% 81.2% 17.9% 82.1%
Coordinator/Consultant 27.9% 72.1% 29.3% 70.7% 30.6% 69.4%
Technician/Analyst/Supervisor 23.0% 77.0% 22.8% 77.2% 24.1% 75.9%
Operator 7.7% 92.3% 7.9% 92.1% 8.7% 91.3%
Intern 57.9% 42.1% 57.4% 42.6% 57.9% 42.1%
Apprentice 48.7% 51.3% 50.8% 49.2% 57.1% 42.9%
Total employees 15.3% 84.7% 15.0% 85.0% 16.1% 83.9%
Members of governance body (%) 9.5% 90.5% 9.5% 90.5% 17.6% 82.4%
Gender diversity in leadership positions ¹ (%) 20.1% 79.9% 20.2% 79.8%
Pessoas com deficiência (%) 2019 2020 2021
President/Director 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Manager/General Manager 1.3% 1.0% 1.0%
Coordinator/Consultant 0.8% 0.8% 0.5%
Technician/Analyst/Supervisor 1.5% 1.5% 1.5%
Operator 2.4% 2.6% 2.5%
Intern 0.2% 0.0% 0.0%
Apprentice 0.4% 0.0% 0.0%
Total employees 1.9% 2.0% 2.0%
Members of governance body (%) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

Scope: Global
The percentage corresponds to the number of employees within each functional category that meets the diversity criteria
¹ The calculation of gender Diversity in leadership Positions includes the Positions of CEO, director, manager, general manager and coordinator.

Ethics, integrity and transparency

Description: Integrity and compliance, ethical and transparent relationships, price integrity and antitrust compliance, legal compliance with standards of competitor relationships

Why it is material to VC?

  • Ensuring high standards of compliance, ethics and transparency is the path to excellence
GRI 205-1: Operations assessed for risks related to corruption
2019 2020 2021
Operations assessed (%) 0% 25% 50%
Significant corruption-related risks identified through this assessment Last year, the Compliance area conducted a self-assessment of its Compliance Program at a global level, including the Anti-Corruption pillar. The selfassessment, which involves several areas of the Company, aims to provide insight into the level of maturity of the pillars that make up the Votorantim Cimentos Compliance Program through an integrated and consolidated panel, as well as to direct the strategy and priority actions to improve compliance over the next years. For VCBR, the Compliance area performed a pilot Anti-Corruption Risk Assessment including two specific areas and exposures in relationships with the Government.
For the other regions, the Compliance area maintained the continuous selfassessment of its Compliance Program at a global level, including the Anti- Corruption pillar. The self-assessment of several areas of the company aims to provide insight into the maturity level of the pillars of the Compliance Program of Votorantim Cimentos through an integrated and consolidated perspective, while also guiding the strategy and priority actions to strengthen and improve compliance in the coming years
“Even though our core business is not related to commercial transactions with governments, at Votorantim Cimentos, like any other legal entity, interactions with the public sector are part of the company’s inherent activities. Therefore, in addition to the compliance evaluations incorporated into the company’s daily processes (for example, integrity assessments of M&A partners and critical third parties, as well as risk assessments for new business models), at VCBR and VCEAA we carried out specific anti-corruption assessments. At VCBR, we mapped all the interactions with the public sector, which enabled us to qualify them, assess our level of control over them, identify the parties involved and train them on anticorruption issues. This mapping confirmed an original perception regarding the absence of significant risks related to corruption and served as a resource to inform integrity processes. At VCEAA, because of the diverse legal framework in the region, we carried out an anti-corruption risk assessment that focused on mapping and evaluating each country’s legislation; we also did a self-assessment of our Compliance Program, including the Anti-Corruption pillar. In the other regions, the Compliance area continued to work on priority issues/gaps identified in previous self-assessments, including anti-corruption training and the background check process.”

Scope: Global

GRI 205-2: Anti-corruption communication and training
2019 2020 2021 ¹
Employees Number of employees Communicated Number of employees Communicated Number of employees Communicated
Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage
President/Director 17 17 100% 17 17 100% 38 38 100%
Manager/General manager 232 232 100% 321 321 100% 366 366 100%
Coordinator/Consultant 397 397 100% 481 481 100% 618 618 100%
Technician/Analyst/Supervisor 2,036 2,036 100% 2,421 2,421 100% 2,909 2,809 97%
Operator 4,377 4,377 100% 6,173 5,293 86% 8,131 7,295 90%
Total number of employees 7,059 7,059 100% 9,413 8,533 91% 12,062 11,126 92%
Members of governance bodies 13 1 8% 11 0 0% 13 13 100%
Business partners ² 4,159 ~50% 9,480 ~50% 21,402 ~70%
2019 2020 2021 ¹
Employees Number of employees Communicated Number of employees Communicated Number of employees Communicated
Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage
President/Director 17 6 35% 17 1 6% 38 17 45%
Manager/General Manager 232 57 25% 321 103 32% 366 104 28%
Coordinator/Consultant 397 102 26% 481 145 30% 618 213 34%
Technician/Analyst/Supervisor 2,036 600 29% 2,421 645 27% 2,909 878 30%
Operator 4,377 1,921 44% 6,173 832 13% 8,131 1,109 30%
Total number of employees 7,059 2,686 38% 9,413 1,726 18% 12,062 2,321 30%
Members of governance bodies 13 1 8% 11 0 0% 13 0 30%

Scope: VCBR, VCNA, VCEAA.
¹ Change in scope: in 2020, the scope of the indicator was VCBR and VCEAA. As of 2021, the scope of the indicator was expanded to include VCBR, VCNA and VCEAA.
² Documents referring to anti-corruption policy

GRI 205-3: Confirmed incidents of corruption and actions taken
2019 2020 2021 ¹
Number of cases of corruption confirmed by the Business Ethics Line 0 0 0

Scope: Global
¹ Change in scope: in 2019 and 2020, the scope of the indicator was VCBR, VCEAA and VCNA. As of 2021, the scope of the indicator was expanded to include the global.

GRI 206-1: Legal actions for anti-competitive behavior, anti-trust, and monopoly practices
2019 2020 2021 ¹
Total number of legal actions for unfair competition, trust and monopoly Practices ¹ 2 2 4
Value of legal actions (R$ million) 6,100  6,344 7,754

Scope: Global
¹Considers only legal actions above R$ 98 million, in line with the standards applied for M&A and Due Diligence.

Responsible use of materials, waste and circular economy

Description: Solid waste management, responsible use of fuels and raw materials, product life cycle analysis, circular economy, reuse and recycling.

Why it is material to VC?

  • Maintain competitiveness in the medium and long terms, generating value for shareholders, employees and for the whole Society.
GRI 306-2: Management of significant waste-related impacts
2021
As per its Global Environmental Policy and Green Rules, Votorantim Cimentos aims to minimize waste production through reuse, recycling and responsible waste disposal. To prevent waste from reaching the environment, it is necessary to:

  • Store waste in closed, ventilated, access-controlled spaces and on impermeable bases that have areas to drain and collect contaminated liquids.
  • Avoid contact between rainwater and waste; if there is contact, the rainwater must be collected for inspection.
  • Train employees to take action in case of incidents, according to the Emergency Plan and the internal and external Communication System.
  • Dispose of waste according to its characteristics and classification.

In addition, internal waste management, separation and temporary storage until final disposal is performed by Votorantim Cimentos. Waste transportation and final disposal is carried out by service providers

Scope: Global

GRI 306-3: Waste generated by composition
2019 2020 2021
Hazardous waste (tonne) 4,921 14,250 3,733
Non-hazardous waste (tonne) 55,412 138,250 97,580

Scope: Global

GRI 306-4: Waste diverted from disposal
2019 2020 2021¹
Diverted from disposal  Hazardous Non-hazardous Hazardous Non-hazardous Hazardous Non-hazardous
Total (tonne) 2,011 18,432 222 47,180 1,547 65,178
Composting 0 1,785 1 3,049 0 46
Reuse 142 6,224 0 27,867 34 35,620
Recycling 1,351 8,618 39 14,103 727 26,161
Recovery 208 1,243 183 1,249 371 2,149
On-site storage 309 562 0 913 414 1,203

Scope: Global
¹In 2021, we acquired new operations that were included in the base and impacted the total hazardous and non-hazardous waste generated by the organization.

GRI 306-5: Waste directed to disposal
2019 2020 2021²
Directed to disposal  Hazardous Non-hazardous Hazardous Non-hazardous Hazardous Non-hazardous
Total (tonne) 2,910 36,980 14,028 91,070 2,186 32,402
Incineration 244 553 12 1,086 19 255
Landfilling 106 12,843 5 86,758 185 12,071
Deep well injection 0 1,585 0 0 0 34
Others 2,560 22,000¹ 14,010 3,226¹ 1,982 20,042¹

Scope: Global
¹For non hazardous waste include coprocessing destination.
²In 2021, we acquired new operations that were included in the base and impacted the total hazardous and non-hazardous waste generated by the organization.

GRI 301-1: Materials used
2019 2020 2021
Non-renewable materials (tonne) 44,048,090 54,048,612 66,529,293
Renewable materials (tonne) 54,429 68,181 66,294

Scope: VCBR, VCNA and VCEAA cement operations.
Materials include raw materials used in the raw meal (flour) phase and in the cement griding phase, alternative raw materials and other materials. All materials used in our process are non-renewable, except biomass.

Risk and crisis management

Description: Assessment and mitigation of risks to which the business is exposed, assessment of market risks, information management, confidentiality, crisis management

Why it is material to VC?

  • Ensure a quick response whenever we identify a topic with a potential negative impact on the company’s performance
Occupational health, well-being and safety

Description: Healthy and safe working conditions (for employees and contractors), ensuring the safety of stakeholders who relate to the company, safe operating processes.

Why it is material to VC?

  • Safety comes first at VC
  • Industry is subject to high risk of occupational acidentes
GRI 403-9: Occupational health and safety
Work-related injuries – Company employees 2019 2020 2021
Fatalities 0 1 0
Rate of fatalities 0.00 0.87 0.00
Number of High-consequence accidents (excluding fatalities) ¹ 4 0 1
Rate of High-consequence accidents (excluding fatalities) ¹ 0.17 0.00 0.04
Number of injuries ² 42 25 33
Rate of lost-time injuries ² 1.83 1.11 1.30
Severity rate 232.16 67.71 63.11
Number of hours worked 22,915,653 22,478,029 25,382,557
Work-related injuries – Contractors 2019 2020 2021
Fatalities 1 0 0
Rate of fatalities 0.05 0.00 0.00
Number of High-consequence accidents (excluding fatalities) ¹ 1 1 1
Rate of High-consequence accidents (excluding fatalities) ¹ 0.05 0.06 0.04
Number of injuries ² 13 20 22
Rate of lost-time injuries ² 0.60 1.17 0.93
Severity rate 19.88 36.66 42.62
Number of hours worked 21,625,476 17,102,640 23,720,780
Total work-related accident rate (employees + contractors)  1.23 1.14 1.12

Scope: Global. Figures do not include Uruguay operations.
¹The number and rate of high-consequence accidents include amputations or six-month leave of absence and exclude deaths.
²The number and rate of accidents consider only lost-time incidents.

Other rates were calculated based on 1,000,000 hours worked. Among employees, the main work-related injuries involve the ankles, feet, hands and fingers, and include sprains and fractures. The greatest risks for high-consequence injuries are dangerous energies, moving and rotating parts, high temperatures, possibility of hot flour leakage, movement of machines and equipment, lifting of loads and activities at height and in confined spaces. These risks are determined after a systematic study of the processes and assessment of the hazards and risks involved.

GLOBAL REPORTING INITIATIVE (GRI)

The GRI Standards enable the understanding and reporting of impacts on economy, environment, and people, providing the highest level of transparency in sustainability reporting.

Economic Performance
102-43: Consumer relations
Net Promoter Score (NPS) survey results 2019 2020 2021
VCBR 73 61 71
VCEAA 36

Scope: VCBR, VCEAA
The indicator can range from -100 to 100.

201-1: Direct economic value generated and distributed
2019 2020 2021
Economic value generated (R$ thousands)  15,877,520  19,600,528 25,914,457
Net revenue  13,026,664  16,740,228 22,295,681
Cement  9,127,448 11,542,316 15,584,206
Concrete  2,606,247 3,561,241 4,771,898
Mortar  481,304  545,417 670,253
Aggregates  425,218  604,661 731,441
Others  386,447  486,593 537,883
Economic value distributed (R$ thousands)  7,157,514  8,941,224 11,630,113
Employee remuneration¹  2,305,332  2,900,373 3,430,794
Taxes and fees²  2,603,860  3,431,588 4,154,439
Third-party capital remuneration³  1,699,082  2,136,807 2,418,168
Economic value retained⁴ 8,720,006 10,659,304 14,284,344

Scope: Global
¹Direct remuneration, retirement plan and pension plan, social charges and benefits
² Federal, State, Municipal and Deferred taxes and contributions
³ Financial expenses and passive exchange variations and rents
4 Non-controlling interest, profit (loss) retained and profit (loss) from discontinued operations

202-2: Local hires
2019 2020 2021
Senior management hired from the local community (%) ¹
VCBR 88,2% 81,3% 81.6%
VCEAA 35,3% 56,25% 60.0%
VCNA 100,0% 95,8% 87.5%
VCLATAM 40,0% 38,5% 46.7%
Employees from the local community (%) ²
VCBR 82,8% 82,4% 89.6%
VCEAA 96,6% 98,4% 98.4%
VCNA 96,4% 99,8% 99.2%
VCLATAM 70,8% 75,9% 75.6%

¹ Includes senior managers, general managers, directors and CEO
² Employees born or naturalized in the country of operation are considered to be local hires at VCNA, VCEAA and in Uruguay. At VCBR and in Bolivia, due to specific local characteristicas, we adopt regional criteria.

204-1: Suppliers
2019 2020 2021
Total amount spent with suppliers (R$ billion) 1.9 3.2 8.4
Total amount spent with local suppliers (R$ billion) 0.9 1.2 4.7
Spent with local suppliers at significant operating locations (%) 49.3% 37.8% 56.3%

Scope: VCBR, VCNA, VCEAA.
Change in scope: in 2020, the scope of the indicator was VCBR. As of 2021, the scope of the indicator was expanded to include VCBR, VCNA and VCEAA. Local suppliers: Due to the territorial extension of the countries where we operate, specific criteria were adopted for each of the regions. VCBR: local suppliers are those located within a 200km radius from the operating unit; VCEAA: local suppliers are those located in the same country of the operating unit; VCNA: suppliers within the United States or the province (Canada) where the plant is located.

205-1: Operations assessed for riscks related to corruption
2019 2020 2021
Operations assessed (%) 0% 25% 50%
Significant corruption-related risks identified through this assessment Last year, the Compliance area conducted a self-assessment of its Compliance Program at a global level, including the Anti-Corruption pillar. The selfassessment, which involves several areas of the Company, aims to provide insight into the level of maturity of the pillars that make up the Votorantim Cimentos Compliance Program through an integrated and consolidated panel, as well as to direct the strategy and priority actions to improve compliance over the next years. For VCBR, the Compliance area performed a pilot Anti-Corruption Risk Assessment including two specific areas and exposures in relationships with the Government.
For the other regions, the Compliance area maintained the continuous selfassessment of its Compliance Program at a global level, including the Anti- Corruption pillar. The self-assessment of several areas of the company aims to provide insight into the maturity level of the pillars of the Compliance Program of Votorantim Cimentos through an integrated and consolidated perspective, while also guiding the strategy and priority actions to strengthen and improve compliance in the coming years
“Even though our core business is not related to commercial transactions with governments, at Votorantim Cimentos, like any other legal entity, interactions with the public sector are part of the company’s inherent activities. Therefore, in addition to the compliance evaluations incorporated into the company’s daily processes (for example, integrity assessments of M&A partners and critical third parties, as well as risk assessments for new business models), at VCBR and VCEAA we carried out specific anti-corruption assessments. At VCBR, we mapped all the interactions with the public sector, which enabled us to qualify them, assess our level of control over them, identify the parties involved and train them on anticorruption issues. This mapping confirmed an original perception regarding the absence of significant risks related to corruption and served as a resource to inform integrity processes. At VCEAA, because of the diverse legal framework in the region, we carried out an anti-corruption risk assessment that focused on mapping and evaluating each country’s legislation; we also did a self-assessment of our Compliance Program, including the Anti-Corruption pillar. In the other regions, the Compliance area continued to work on priority issues/gaps identified in previous self-assessments, including anti-corruption training and the background check process.”

Scope: Global

205-2: Anti-corruption communication and training
2019 2020 2021 ¹
Employees Number of employees Communicated Number of employees Communicated Number of employees Communicated
Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage
President/Director 17 17 100% 17 17 100% 38 38 100%
Manager/General manager 232 232 100% 321 321 100% 366 366 100%
Coordinator/Consultant 397 397 100% 481 481 100% 618 618 100%
Technician/Analyst/Supervisor 2,036 2,036 100% 2,421 2,421 100% 2,909 2,809 97%
Operator 4,377 4,377 100% 6,173 5,293 86% 8,131 7,295 90%
Total number of employees 7,059 7,059 100% 9,413 8,533 91% 12,062 11,126 92%
Members of governance bodies 13 1 8% 11 0 0% 13 13 100%
Business partners ² 4,159 ~50% 9,480 ~50% 21,402 ~70%
2019 2020 2021 ¹
Employees Number of employees Communicated Number of employees Communicated Number of employees Communicated
Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage
President/Director 17 6 35% 17 1 6% 38 17 45%
Manager/General Manager 232 57 25% 321 103 32% 366 104 28%
Coordinator/Consultant 397 102 26% 481 145 30% 618 213 34%
Technician/Analyst/Supervisor 2,036 600 29% 2,421 645 27% 2,909 878 30%
Operator 4,377 1,921 44% 6,173 832 13% 8,131 1,109 30%
Total number of employees 7,059 2,686 38% 9,413 1,726 18% 12,062 2,321 30%
Members of governance bodies 13 1 8% 11 0 0% 13 0 30%

Scope: VCBR, VCNA, VCEAA.
¹ Change in scope: in 2020, the scope of the indicator was VCBR and VCEAA. As of 2021, the scope of the indicator was expanded to include VCBR, VCNA and VCEAA.
² Documents referring to anti-corruption policy

205-3: Confirmed cases of corruption and actions taken
2019 2020 2021 ¹
Number of cases of corruption confirmed by the Business Ethics Line 0 0 0

Scope: Global
¹ Change in scope: in 2019 and 2020, the scope of the indicator was VCBR, VCEAA and VCNA. As of 2021, the scope of the indicator was expanded to include the global.

206-1: Legal actions for anti-competitive behavior, anti-trust, and monopoly practices
2019 2020 2021 ¹
Total number of legal actions for unfair competition, trust and monopoly Practices ¹ 2 2 4
Value of legal actions (R$ million)  6,100  6,344  7,754

Scope: Global
¹Considers only legal actions above R$ 98 million, in line with the standards applied for M&A and Due Diligence.

308-1: Suppliers that were selected using environmental criteria
2019 2020 2021
Total number of new suppliers 751 836 1,262
Total number of new suppliers selected according to environmental criteria 751 836 137
New suppliers selected according to environmental criteria (%) 100% 100% 10.9%

Scope: VCBR
Change in the indicator’s accounting method starting in 2021: number of suppliers approved in the registration process for categories that consider environmental and social criteria and number of suppliers that were re-approved for the first time and received a purchase order in the current year. 100% of suppliers go through an approval process via the SIPM Ariba platform. As part of this process, suppliers that fall into environmental and social categories must meet certain procurement criteria. VSA performs the analysis and rejects the approval of suppliers that do not meet the pre-defined criteria. The suppliers of inputs and alternative fuels (Verdera) were considered in the evaluation, according to the criteria for prioritizing supplies.

308-2: Number of suppliers identified as causing negative environmental impact and actions taken
2019 2020 2021
Number of suppliers identified as causing negative environmental impact and actions taken Not monitored Not monitored 7

Scope: VCBR. In 2021, risk mapping was carried out for each procurement category. Action plans were created for suppliers with greater risk potential, which are periodically monitored by the Risk and Sustainability Committee.

406-1: Discrimination incidents received and corrective actions taken
Total number of incidents of discrimination received by the business ethics office and corrective actions taken 2019 2020 2021
Race/color 2 5 1
Age group 0 0 0
Gender 0 0 0
Religion 0 0 1
Political opinion 0 1 0
Nationality or nacionality 1 4 0
Social origin 0 0 0
Physical conditions 1 0 0
Harassment and abuse of power 0 0 0
Other incidents (discrimination) 0 0 4
Total number of incidents analyzed 4 10 6
Analyzed and considered unfounded 2 6 1
Analyzed and considered well-founded 1 1 3
Analyzed and considered inconclusive 1 2 1
Under analysis 0 0 1
Without sufficient information for investigation 0 1 0

Scope: Global
¹ Change in scope: in 2019 and 2020, the scope of the indicator was VCBR, VCEAA and VCNA. As of 2021, the scope was expanded to global.

408-1: Child labor
2021
Operations at significant risk for incidents of child labor Compulsory and child labor are issues included the Votorantim Cimentos Code of Conduct, which addresses our commitment to the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the UN Global Compact and has among its principles to eliminate all forms of forced or compulsory labor and eradicate all forms of child labor from our production chain. These practices are prohibited in all company and commercial partners’ facilities. It is also prohibited to hire any organization that does not follow our Company’s conduct guidelines. This issue is also addressed in the event of complaints to our Business Ethics Office, which is prepared to carry out investigations and verify the materiality of the complaint. All the suppliers contracted must be submitted to the registration process. The Office of Labor (within the Ministry of Economy) Restricted List is cross-checked with our SAP list of suppliers. If there is evidence of misconduct, the supplier is demobilized and blocked to prevent future hiring. The Votorantim Cimentos General Conditions Term states that all suppliers must follow our Code of Conduct (ethics, values and compliance with labor legislation). Through the new SIPM tool, suppliers must accept our General Conditions Term; otherwise they are rejected in the certification process. They must also fill out a Compliance Survey, in which they need to address several topics, including child labor. If the survey answers are unsatisfactory, the supplier is submitted for analysis by the Compliance area and may be rejected in the certification process.
Operations at risk of having young workers exposed to dangerous work
Suppliers at significant risk for incidents of child labor
Suppliers at risk of having young workers exposed to dangerous work

Scope: Global

409-1: Forced or compulsory labor
2021
Operations at significant risk for incidents of forced or compulsory labor Compulsory and child labor are issues included the Votorantim Cimentos Code of Conduct, which addresses our commitment to the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the UN Global Compact and has among its principles to eliminate all forms of forced or compulsory labor and eradicate all forms of child labor from our production chain. These practices are prohibited in all company and commercial partners’ facilities. It is also prohibited to hire any organization that does not follow our Company’s conduct guidelines. This issue is also addressed in the event of complaints to our Business Ethics Office, which is prepared to carry out investigations and verify the materiality of the complaint. All the suppliers contracted must be submitted to the registration process. The Office of Labor (within the Ministry of Economy) Restricted List is cross-checked with our SAP list of suppliers. If there is evidence of misconduct, the supplier is demobilized and blocked to prevent future hiring. The Votorantim Cimentos General Conditions Term states that all suppliers must follow our Code of Conduct (ethics, values and compliance with labor legislation). Through the new SIPM tool, suppliers must accept our General Conditions Term; otherwise they are rejected in the certification process. They must also fill out a Compliance Survey, in which they need to address several topics, including child labor. If the survey answers are unsatisfactory, the supplier is submitted for analysis by the Compliance area and may be rejected in the certification process.
Suppliers at significant risk for inci-dents of forced or compulsory labor incidents

Scope: Global

411-1: Indigenous rights
2019 2020 2021
Número total de incidentes com violação de direitos indígenas 0 0 0

Scope: Global
¹ Change in scope: in 2019 and 2020, the scope of the indicator was VCBR, VCEAA and VCNA. As of 2021, the scope of the indicator was expanded to include the global.

414-1: Suppliers selected according to social criteria
2019 2020 2021
Total number of new suppliers 751 836 1,262
Total number of new suppliers selected according to social criteria 751 836 806
New suppliers selected according to social criteria (%) 100% 100% 63.9%

Scope: VCBR
Change in the indicator’s accounting method starting in 2021: number of suppliers approved in the registration process for categories that consider environmental and social criteria and number of suppliers that were re-approved for the first time and received a purchase order in the current year. 100% of suppliers go through an approval process via the SIPM Ariba platform. As part of this process, suppliers that fall into environmental and social categories must meet certain procurement criteria. VSA performs the analysis and rejects the approval of suppliers that do not meet the pre-defined criteria. The suppliers of inputs and alternative fuels (Verdera) were considered in the evaluation, according to the criteria for prioritizing supplies.

414-2: Number of suppliers identified as causing negative social impact and actions taken
2019 2020 2021
Number of suppliers identified as causing negative social impact and actions taken Not monitored Not monitored 0

Scope: VCBR. In 2021, risk mapping was carried out for each procurement category. Action plans were created for suppliers with greater risk potential, which are periodically monitored by the Risk and Sustainability Committee.

415-1: Government relations
2019 2020 2021
Political contributions 0 0 0

Scope: VCBR, VCNA, VCEAA

419-1: Socioeconomic non compliance
2019 2020 2021
Total number of significat fines received in the year¹ 0 0 1
Total monetary value of significant fines received in the year (R$ million) 0 0 1.6
Total number of non-monetary sanctions² 0 0 0
Number of cases (fines + sactions) brought through dispute resolution mechanism 0 0 1

Scope: Global
¹Significant monetary fines: value above R$ 1 million. ²Non-monetary sanctions that cause interruptions or adjustments over R$ 5 million.

Environmental Performance
301-1: Material used
2019 2020 2021
Non-renewable materials (tonne)  44.048.090  54.048.612  66.529.293
Renewable materials (tonne) 54.429  68.181 66.294

Scope: VCBR, VCNA and VCEAA cement operations.
Materials include raw materials used in the raw meal (flour) phase and in the cement griding phase, alternative raw materials and other materials. All materials used in our process are non-renewable, except biomass.

302-1: Energy consumption inside the organization
Non-renewable sources (GJ) 2019 2020 2021
Cement 71,774,692 75,249,280 95,601,831
Aggregates 72,528 77,412 71,983
Concrete 220,278 220,288 254,853
Mortar 12,254 11,785 15,206
Limes and agricultural inputs 29,427 24,900 24,328
Total 72,109,178 75,583,666 95,968,201
Renewable sources (GJ) 2019 2020 2021
Cement 8,593,891 10,244,265 12,857,184
Aggregates 9,283 11,049 9,079
Concrete 32,274 36,073 35,518
Mortar 6,927 15,090 33,999
Limes and agricultural inputs 2,040,042 1,695,075 1,759,473
Total 10,682,417 12,001,552 14,695,253
Electricity (MWh) 2019 2020 2021
Cement 3,422,937 3,707,824 4,242,316
Aggregates 10,294 4,368 8,943
Concrete 3,067 3,086 3,394
Mortar 7,928 7,601 8,544
Limes and agricultural inputs 47,561 50,094 50,096
Total 3,491,786 3,772,973 4,313,292
Total consumption (GJ) 2019 2020 2021
Cement 92,691,154 98,841,710 123,731.351
Aggregates 118,870 104,187 113,256
Concrete 263,591 267,470 302,590
Mortar 47,721 54,238 79,963
Limes and agricultural inputs 2,240,690 1,900,314 1,964,147
Total 95,362,025 101,167,919 126,191,306

Scope: all VCBR operations and VCEAA, VCNA and VCLATAM cement operations.

302-2: Energy consumption outside the organization
Transport and distribution (GJ) 2019 2020 2021
VCBR  4,101,619  3,862,299  4,322,852

Scope: VCBR

302-3: Energy intensity
Fuels 2019 2020 2021
Clinker (MJ/ton of clinker)  3,474  3,398 3,584
Aggregates (MJ/ton of product) 22  28  26
Concrete (MJ/m³ of product) 142  141  144
Mortar (MJ/ton of product) 27  39  62
Lime and agricultural inputs (MJ/ton of product) 996  819  816
Electricity ¹ 2019 2020 2021
Cement (KWh/ton of cement)  112  109  109
Aggregates (KWh/ton of product)  2.7  1.4  2.9
Concrete (KWh/m³ of product)  1.7  1.7  1.7
Mortar (KWh/ton of product)  11.2  11.0  10.8
Lime and agricultural inputs (KWh/ton of product)  22.9  23.8  22.9

Scope: all VCBR operations and VCEAA, VCNA and VCLATAM cement operations.
The cement business has the highest energy consumption (98%)

303-3: Water withdrawn by source
2019 2020 2021
Water withdrawn – Cement (megaliter) All areas Areas with water stress All areas All areas Todas as áreas Areas with water stress
Surface water 11,763 6,372 13,110 5,978 13,107 6,080
Groundwater 1,750 817 1,054 177 2,818 221
Rainwater 5.7 0.0 14.4 0.9 43.4 0.2
Produced water 31,213 24,804 39,663 16,806 41,496 14,954
Third-party water 233 157 363 138 258 196
Total 44,965 32,150 54,205 23,099 57,723 21,451
2019 2020 2021
Water withdrawn – Concrete (megaliter) All areas Areas with water stress All areas Areas with water stress All areas Areas with water stress
Surface water 0 0 0 0 9 0
Groundwater 321 0 1,002 0 1,042 0
Rainwater 0 0 0 0 0 0
Produced water 0 0 0 0 0 0
Third-party water 334 0 155 0 164 0
Total 655 0 1,157 0 1,214 0

¹Scope: Global
²Change in scope: in 2019 and 2020, the scope of the indicator was VCBR. As of 2021, the scope was expanded to VCBR and Uruguay.
The data was obtained by measurement and estimates. Water stress analysis was performed using the Aqueduct tool

303-4: Water discharge by source
2019 2020 2021
Water discharge – Cement (megaliter) All areas Areas with water stress All areas Areas with water stress All areas Areas with water stress
Surface water 35,015 27,985 44,429 17,997 45,828 15,729
Groundwater 11.0 0 164 12.8 119 2.3
Sea water 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Water sent to third-party supplier 32.0 8.9 40.1 11.3 29.8 13.9
Total 35,058 27,994 44,632 18,021 45,977 15,745

Scope: Global. The data was obtained by measurement and estimative. Water stress analysis was performed using the Aqueduct tool.

303-5: Water consumption
2019 2020 2021
Water consumption – cement (megaliter) All areas Areas with water stress All areas Areas with water stress All areas Areas with water stress
Total water withdrawn 44,965 32,150 54,205 23,099 57,723 21,451
Total water discharged 35,058 27,994 44,632 18,021 45,977 15,745
Total water consumed 9,907 4,156 9,573 5,078 11,746 5,706

Scope: Global.

304-1: Biodiversity and resource conservation
2019 2020 2021
Total number of mines 130 127 135
Mines with closure plans (%) |GRI MM10| 93.1% 93.7% 91.1%
Total number of high biodiversity value units 12 11 10
Number of high biodiversity value areas with existing biodiversity management plans|GRI MM2| 7 8 8
Units with high biodiversity value with existing biodiversity management plans (%) |GRI MM2| 58.3% 72.7% 80.0%

Scope: Global
According to the “Votorantim Cimentos Biodiversity Management Plan Manual”, the identification of areas of high biodiversity value considers three factors:
– The importance of the area of high biodiversity relevance overlapping with the mining area;
– The percentage of overlap between the area of high biodiversity relevance and the mining area (considering a 5-km radius from the center of the mine);
– The distance of the area of high biodiversity relevance to the mining center.
We apply the methodology and rank all areas that are close to or overlap with areas of high biodiversity value, according to these criteria.

304-3: Protected habitats
Habitats protected or restored (in km²) 2019 2020 2021 ¹
Amazônia 28,72 33,72 21,95
Type of area LR, PPA LR, PPA LR, PPA
Status of the area Preserved Preserved Preserved
Caatinga 3,36 5,79 7,50
Type of area LR, PPA LR, PPA LR, PPA
Status of the area Preserved Preserved Preserved
Cerrado 25,52 25,52 25,54
Type of area LR, PPA, PRNH, WRA LR, PPA, PRNH, WRA LR, PPA, PRNH, WRA
Status of the area Preserved Preserved Preserved
Mata Atlântica 50,03 87,70 45,35
Type of area LR, PPA LR, PPA LR, PPA, PRNH
Status of the area Preserved Preserved Preserved
Pantanal 1,68 1,68 1,68
Type of area LR, PPA LR, PPA LR, PPA
Status of the area Preserved Preserved Preserved
Pampa 4,22 4,22 2,40
Type of area LR, PPA LR, PPA LR, PPA
Status of the area Preserved Preserved Preserved

Scope: VCBR. Brazillian classification of areas: Legal Reserve (LR), Permanent Protection Area (PPA), Private Reserve of Natural Heritage (PRNH), Wildlife Refuge Area (WRA). The indicator only considers protected habitats. ¹Change in the indicator’s accounting methodology from 2021.

304-4: Species included in national and international conservation lists
Total number of species in the IUCN Red List and with habitats in areas affected by operations 2019 2020 2021¹
Critically endangered 8 1 0
Endangered 24 26 0
Vulnerable 53 39 7
Near Threatened 17 28 12
Least concern² N/A N/A N/A
Total number of species in the National Conservation List and with habitats in areas affected by operations 2019 2020 2021¹
Critically endangered 0 0 0
Endangered 2 2 1
Vulnerable 21 17 10
Near Threatened 12 13 2
Least concern² N/A N/A N/A

Scope: VCBR
¹ Change in the indicator’s accounting method: in previous years, the indicator considered the accumulated wealth, which explains the high number of species in all categories. As of 2021, the indicator considers only the species sampled in the year.
² Information not available due to a focus on identifying species of greatest concern for conservation.

305-1: Direct CO2 emissions and emission intensity (Scope 1)
Cement 2019 2020 2021
Gross absolute CO2 emission (tCO2) 19,027,609 20,421,293 24,877,550
Net absolute CO2 emission (tCO2) 18,280,538 19,630,033 23,999,550
Aggregates 2019 2020 2021
Absolute CO2 emission (tCO2e) 4,943 5,199 5,168
Concrete 2019 2020 2021
Absolute CO2 emission (tCO2e) 16,430 20,455 19,007
Mortar 2019 2020 2021
Absolute CO2 emission (tCO2e) 1,853 1,674 1,563
Lime and agricultural inputs 2019 2020 2021
Absolute CO2 emission (tCO2e) 156,781 184,422 194,582
Total – Scope 1 19,207,615 20,633,043 25,097,870
Biogenic emissions – Scope 1 (tCO2) 1,189,082 1,322,731 1,524,961

Scope 1 emissions include cement operations in Brazil, VCNA, VCEAA and VCLATAM through a consolidation approach. Emissions from the Cement business were calculated considering the GCCA guidelines for calculating the sector’s CO2 emissions. Emissions from other businesses were calculated considering the guidelines of the Brazilian GHG Protocol Program. The gases included in the calculation for scope 1 were: CO2, CH4, N2O. ¹Increase due to a change in scope and the acquisition of two new cement operations (McInnis and Balboa), which are still at a lower level of thermal substitution and clinker factor, in addition to reduced thermal substitution in some regions due to limited access to waste caused by the pandemic in a time of increased cement production.

305-2: Indirect CO2 emissions through purchased energy (scope 2)
Indirect CO2 emissions – Scope 2 (tCO2) 2019 2020 2021¹
Cement  660,573  532,913 771,610
Concrete 230 190 429
Aggregates 772 269 1,130
Mortar 595 469 574
Lime and agricultural inputs  3,569  3,092 6,333
Total – Scope 2  665,739  536,934 780,076

Scope 2 activities consider emissions related to electricity purchased by Brazilian operations and VCNA, VCEAA and VCLatam cement operations.
¹Increase due to a change in scope and the acquisition of two new cement operations (McInnis and Balboa).

305-3: Other indirect emissions (scope 3)
Other indirect emissions – Scope 3 (tCO2e) 2019 2020 2021¹
Transportation of inputs and final products  581,035  249,061  5,158,605
Total – Scope 3  581,035  249,061  5,158,605
Biogenic emissions (tCO2)  61,437  30,661  30,297

¹For 2021, we refined our Scope 3 inventory including the emissions from purchased goods and services, fuel and energy related activities, upstream and downstream transportation and distribution. In the last years, the scope 3 considered only transportation and distribution.

305-4: GHG emission intensity
Cement 2019 2020 2021¹
Gross specific CO2 emission (kg CO2/t cementitious) 615 599 619
Net specific CO2 emission (kg CO2/t cementitious) 591 576 597
Aggregates 2019 2020 2021
Specific CO2 emission (kgCO2e/t aggregates) 1.30  1.63 1.69
Concrete 2019 2020 2021
Specific CO2 emission (kgCO2e/t concrete) 9.22  11.22 9.42
Mortar 2019 2020 2021
Specific CO2 emission (kgCO2e/t mortar) 2.62  2.42 1.98
Lime and agricultural inputs 2019 2020 2021
Specific CO2 emission (kgCO2e/t lime and agricultural inputs)  75.49  87.78 89.06

Scope 1 emissions include cement operations in Brazil, VCNA, VCEAA and VCLATAM through a consolidation approach. Emissions from the Cement business were calculated considering the GCCA guidelines for calculating the sector’s CO2 emissions. Emissions from other businesses were calculated considering the guidelines of the Brazilian GHG Protocol Program. The gases included in the calculation for scope 1 were: CO2, CH4, N2O.
¹Increase due to a change in scope and the acquisition of two new cement operations (McInnis and Balboa), which are still at a lower level of thermal substitution and clinker factor, in addition to reduced thermal substitution in some regions due to limited access to waste caused by the pandemic in a time of increased cement production.

305-5: Reduction of GHG emissions
2019 2020 2021 Ano-base/ denominador 
CO2 reduction as a direct result of initiatives (%) 23% 25% 22%  1990

Scopo: Global

305-7: Other air emissions
2019 2020 2021
Number of kilns reported 35 36 39
NOx 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (tonne/year) 39,186 35,385 41,150
Specific emissions (g/tonne clinker) 1,734 1,483 1,394
SOx 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (tonne/year) 16,330 15,918 20,282
Specific emissions (g/tonne clinker) 723 667 687
PM (Dust) 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (tonne /year) 1,318 1,041 1,122
Specific emissions (g/tonne clinker) 58 44 38
Mercury 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (kg/year) 274 200 311
Specific emissions (mg/tonne clinker) 12 8 11
VOC 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (ton/year) 1,413 1,298 3,473
Specific emissions (g/tonne clinker) 63 54 118
Dioxins/Furans 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (mg/year) 2,239 2,866 541
Specific emissions (μg/tonne clinker) 0.10 0.12 0.02
HM1¹ 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (kg/year) 500 324 564
Specific emissions (mg/tonne clinker) 22 14 19
HM2² 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (kg/year) 20,079 16,407 14,022
Specific emissions (mg/tonne clinker) 889 688 475
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)³ 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (tonne/year) 80
Specific emissions (g/tonne clinker) 0.01
Monitoring data
Overall coverage rate (KPI1) 90% 85% 82%
Coverage rate continuous measurement (KPI2) 100% 100% 100%

Scope: Global
¹HM1: Cadmium and Thallium.
²HM2: Antimony, Arsenic, Lead, Chromium, Cobalt, Copper, Manganese, Nickel, Vanadium.
³Setor average in Spain, extrapolated to Tunisia, Morocco and Turkey. In 2021, we had an increase in emissions in some of the parameters, as result of three factors: higher number of kilns in operation in 2021, compared to 2020; significant increase in clinker production; and significantly higher rate of waste co-processing. KPI1: Monitoring of all pollutants mentioned in the emissions guidelines. KPI2: Monitoring of PM, NOx and SOx.

306-2: Management of significant waste-related impacts
2021
As per its Global Environmental Policy and Green Rules, Votorantim Cimentos aims to minimize waste production through reuse, recycling and responsible waste disposal. To prevent waste from reaching the environment, it is necessary to:

  • Store waste in closed, ventilated, access-controlled spaces and on impermeable bases that have areas to drain and collect contaminated liquids.
  • Avoid contact between rainwater and waste; if there is contact, the rainwater must be collected for inspection.
  • Train employees to take action in case of incidents, according to the Emergency Plan and the internal and external Communication System.
  • Dispose of waste according to its characteristics and classification.

In addition, internal waste management, separation and temporary storage until final disposal is performed by Votorantim Cimentos. Waste transportation and final disposal is carried out by service providers

Scope: Global

306-3: Waste generated by composition
2019 2020 2021
Hazardous waste (tonne) 4,921 14,250 3,733
Non-hazardous waste (tonne) 55,412 138,250 97,580

Scope: Global

306-4: Waste diverted from disposal
2019 2020 2021¹
Diverted from disposal  Hazardous Non-hazardous Hazardous Non-hazardous Hazardous Non-hazardous
Total (tonne) 2,011 18,432 222 47,180 1,547 65,178
Composting 0 1,785 1 3,049 0 46
Reuse 142 6,224 0 27,867 34 35,620
Recycling 1,351 8,618 39 14,103 727 26,161
Recovery 208 1,243 183 1,249 371 2,149
On-site storage 309 562 0 913 414 1,203

Scope: Global
¹In 2021, we acquired new operations that were included in the base and impacted the total hazardous and non-hazardous waste generated by the organization.

GRI 306-5: Waste directed to disposal
2019 2020 2021²
Directed to disposal  Hazardous Non-hazardous Hazardous Non-hazardous Hazardous Non-hazardous
Total (tonne) 2,910 36,980 14,028 91,070 2,186 32,402
Incineration 244 553 12 1,086 19 255
Landfilling 106 12,843 5 86,758 185 12,071
Deep well injection 0 1,585 0 0 0 34
Others 2,560 22,000¹ 14,010 3,226¹ 1,982 20,042¹

Scope: Global
¹ For non hazardous waste include coprocessing destination. ²In 2021, we acquired new operations that were included in the base and impacted the total hazardous and non-hazardous waste generated by the organization.

307-1: Non-compliance with the environmental laws and/or regulations
2019 2020 2021
Total number of significant fines received for non-compliance with environmental laws and/or regula-tions 0 1 1
Total monetary value of significant fines received in the year (in millions R$) ¹ 0 1.2 1.2
Total number of non-monetary sanction ² 1 1 0
Number of cases (both fines and sanctions) brought through dispute resolution mechanism 0 1 2

Scope: Global
¹ Significant monetary fines: value above R$ 1 million.
² Non-monetary sanctions that cause interruptions or adjustments over R$ 5 million.

Social Performance
102-8: Employment
By type of employment 2019 2020 2021
Full-time Female 1,468 1,507 1,679
Male 9,818 9,796 10,210
Total 11,286 11,303 11,889
Part-time Female 366 264 332
Male 301 216 245
Total 667 480 577
By employment contract 2019 2020 2021
Temporary Female 18 15 13
Male 148 132 136
Total 166 147 149
Permanent Female 1,816 1,756 1,998
Male 9,971 9,880 10,319
Total 11,787 11,636 12,317
Total employees Female 1,834 1,771 2,011
Male 10,119 10,012 10,455
Total 11,953 11,783 12,466

Scope: Global

102-41: Collective Bargaining Agreements
2019 2020 2021
Total number of employees  11,953  11,783  12,466
Employees covered by collective bargaining agreement  9,263  9,358  9,791
Employees covered by collective bargaining agreement (%) 77.5% 79.4% 78.5%

Scope: Global

401-1: Turnover
Total number and rate of employee turnover 2019 2020 2021
By gender Number Rate Number Rate Number Rate
Female 500 4.2% 485 4.1% 566 4.5%
Male 1,965 16.4% 1,589 13.5% 1,976 15.9%
By age group Number Rate Number Rate Number Rate
Under 30 years old 908 7.6% 800 6.8% 924 7.4%
30-50 years old 1,224 10.2% 984 8.4% 1,214 9.7%
Over 50 years old 333 2.8% 290 2.5% 403 3.2%
By region Number Rate Number Rate Number Rate
VCBR 1,742 22.5% 1,530 20.0% 1,798 22.4%
VCEAA 268 19.1% 147 11.0% 152 10.9%
VCNA 412 17.0% 367 15.2% 557 0.0%
VCLATAM 43 10.9% 30 7.7% 34 8.7%
Total rate of employee turnover 20.6% 17.6% 20.4%
Total number and rate of new employee hires 2019 2020 2021
By gender Number Rate Number Rate Number Rate
Female 646 5.4% 406 3.4% 417 3.3%
Male 1,855 15.5% 1,404 11.9% 1,792 14.4%
By age group Number Rate Number Rate Number Rate
Under 30 years old 1,168 9.8% 832 7.1% 800 6.4%
30-50 years old 1,182 9.9% 937 8.0% 1,269 10.2%
Over 50 years old 151 1.3% 124 1.1% 140 1.1%
By region Number Rate Number Rate Number Rate
VCBR 1,975 25.5% 1,431 18.7% 1,622 20.3%
VCEAA 87 6.2% 81 6.0% 209 15.0%
VCNA 407 16.8% 365 15.1% 342 12.8%
VCLATAM 32 8.1% 26 6.7% 36 9.2%
Total rate of new employee hires 20.9% 16.2% 17.7%

Scope: Global

403-9: Occupational health and safety
Work-related injuries – Company employees 2019 2020 2021
Fatalities 0 1 0
Rate of fatalities 0.00 0.87 0.00
Number of High-consequence accidents (excluding fatalities) ¹ 4 0 1
Rate of High-consequence accidents (excluding fatalities) ¹ 0.17 0.00 0.04
Number of injuries ² 42 25 33
Rate of lost-time injuries ² 1.83 1.11 1.30
Severity rate 232.16 67.71 63.11
Number of hours worked 22,915,653 22,478,029 25,382,557
Work-related injuries – Contractors 2019 2020 2021
Fatalities 1 0 0
Rate of fatalities 0.05 0.00 0.00
Number of High-consequence accidents (excluding fatalities) ¹ 1 1 1
Rate of High-consequence accidents (excluding fatalities) ¹ 0.05 0.06 0.04
Number of injuries ² 13 20 22
Rate of lost-time injuries ² 0.60 1.17 0.93
Severity rate 19.88 36.66 42.62
Number of hours worked 21,625,476 17,102,640 23,720,780
Total work-related accident rate (employees + contractors)  1.23 1.14 1.12

Scope: Global. Figures do not include Uruguay operations.
¹The number and rate of high-consequence accidents include amputations or six-month leave of absence and exclude deaths.
²The number and rate of accidents consider only lost-time incidents.

Other rates were calculated based on 1,000,000 hours worked. Among employees, the main work-related injuries involve the ankles, feet, hands and fingers, and include sprains and fractures. The greatest risks for high-consequence injuries are dangerous energies, moving and rotating parts, high temperatures, possibility of hot flour leakage, movement of machines and equipment, lifting of loads and activities at height and in confined spaces. These risks are determined after a systematic study of the processes and assessment of the hazards and risks involved.

404-1: Average hours of training
2019 2020 2021
By functional category Female Male Female Male Female Male
President/Director 10 11 1 8 3 9
Manager/General Manager 14 27 22 27 60 26
Coordinator/Consultant 26 31 24 33 41 27
Technician/Analyst/Supervisor 20 25 24 31 19 18
Operator 10 16 11 13 8 16
Average hours of training (female + male) 16 18 19

Scope: Global

405-1: Diversity
2019 2020 2021
By age group (%) Under 30 years old 30-50 years old Over 50 years old Under 30 years old 30-50 years old Over 50 years old Under 30 years old 30-50 years old Over 50 years old
President/Director 0.0% 48.6% 51.4% 0.0% 38.9% 61.1% 0.0% 40.0% 60.0%
Manager/General Manager 2.1% 75.5% 22.4% 1.0% 72.2% 26.7% 0.2% 72.1% 27.7%
Coordinator/Consultant 10.1% 74.0% 15.9% 5.8% 75.7% 18.5% 5.4% 77.3% 17.3%
Technician/Analyst/Supervisor 17.8% 67.2% 15.1% 15.6% 67.8% 16.6% 15.5% 69.1% 15.5%
Operator 18.9% 59.8% 20.7% 17.1% 59.9% 23.0% 18.4% 60.3% 21.4%
Intern 97.9% 2.1% 0.0% 95.8% 4.2% 0.0% 94.6% 5.4% 0.0%
Apprentice 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 100.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Total employees 22.2% 59.7% 18.1% 18.9% 60.7% 20.5% 19.9% 61.0% 19.1%
Members of governance body (%) 0.0% 38.1% 61.9% 0.0% 38.1% 61.9% 0.0% 23.5% 76.5%
2019 2020 2021
By gender (%) Female Male Female Male Female Male
President/Director 10.8% 89.2% 8.3% 91.7% 7.5% 92.5%
Manager/General Manager 16.8% 83.2% 18.8% 81.2% 17.9% 82.1%
Coordinator/Consultant 27.9% 72.1% 29.3% 70.7% 30.6% 69.4%
Technician/Analyst/Supervisor 23.0% 77.0% 22.8% 77.2% 24.1% 75.9%
Operator 7.7% 92.3% 7.9% 92.1% 8.7% 91.3%
Intern 57.9% 42.1% 57.4% 42.6% 57.9% 42.1%
Apprentice 48.7% 51.3% 50.8% 49.2% 57.1% 42.9%
Total employees 15.3% 84.7% 15.0% 85.0% 16.1% 83.9%
Members of governance body (%) 9.5% 90.5% 9.5% 90.5% 17.6% 82.4%
Gender diversity in leadership positions ¹ (%) 20.1% 79.9% 20.2% 79.8%
People with disability (%) 2019 2020 2021
President/Director 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Manager/General Manager 1.3% 1.0% 1.0%
Coordinator/Consultant 0.8% 0.8% 0.5%
Technician/Analyst/Supervisor 1.5% 1.5% 1.5%
Operator 2.4% 2.6% 2.5%
Intern 0.2% 0.0% 0.0%
Apprentice 0.4% 0.0% 0.0%
Total employees 1.9% 2.0% 2.0%
Members of governance body (%) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

Scope: Global
The percentage corresponds to the number of employees within each functional category that meets the diversity criteria
¹ The calculation of gender Diversity in leadership Positions includes the Positions of CEO, director, manager, general manager and coordinator.

413-1: Social Transformation
Operations with implemented local community engagement, impact assessments, and/or development programs 2019 2020 2021
Total number of operations¹ 305 323 336
Number of operations with implemented local community engagement, impact assessments, and/or development programs 124 108 155
Operations with implemented local community engagement, impact assessments, and/or development programs (%) |VC 2030| 41% 33% 46%
Global social investment (R$ thousand) 2019 2020 2021
VCBR 14,513.3 7,975.1 8,749.7
VCEAA 1,706.3 2,151.3 1,509.7
VCNA 1,379.5 810.4 1,729.6
VCLATAM 831.3 768.6 725.5
Total 18,430.5 11,705.3 12,714.5

Scopo: Global.
¹ Total number of sites mapped for the social engagement plan.

GLOBAL CEMENT AND CONCRETE ASSOCIATION CHARTER (GCCA)

GCCA guidelines include a series of simple, reliable, and representative indicators which cover the sustainability spectrum for cement and concrete sector.

KPIs GCCA Charter
Climate protection
2019 2020 2021
Total CO2 emissions – gross (million tonne) 19.0 20.4 24.9
Total CO2 emissions – net (million tonne) 18.3 19.6 24.0
Specific CO2 emissions – gross (kg/tonne cementitious material) 615 599 619
Specific CO2 emissions – net (kg/tonne cementitious material) 591 576 597

“Scope: Global
¹Increase due to a change in scope and the acquisition of two new cement operations (McInnis and Balboa), which are still at a lower level of thermal substitution and clinker factor, in addition to reduced thermal substitution in some regions due to limited access to waste caused by the pandemic in a time of increased cement production.

Responsable use of fuels and raw materials
2019 2020 2021
Specific heat consumption of clinker production (MJ/tonne clinker) 3,474 3,398 3,584
Alternative fossil fuel rate (%) 11.6% 11.6% 10.3%
Biomass fuel rate (%) 11.0% 12.3% 12.1%
Alternative raw materials rate (%) 6.2% 7.5% 9.2%
Clinker / cement ratio (%) 74.3% 74.0% 74.9%

Scope: Global

Safety
2019 2020 2021
Number of fatalities (directly employed) 0 1 0
Number of fatalities per 10.000 directly employed 0 0.87 0.0
Number of fatalities (indirectly employed)¹ 1 1 0
Number of fatalities (third party) 1 0 0
Number of days lost due to injuries (calendar days / directly employees) 5,320 1,522 1,602
Total Number of days lost due to injuries (calendar days / directly + indirectly employees) 5,750 2,149 2,613
Lost time injuries per 1 million man-hours (directly employed) 1.83 1.11 1.30

Scope: Global
Figures do not include Uruguay operations.
¹Considers on-site occurrences in cement, aggregates, mortar, logistic, aglime and concrete facilities.

Emissions reduction
Emissions reduction¹ 2019 2020 2021
Overall coverage rate (KPI1)² 90% 85% 82%
Coverage rate continuous measurement (KPI2)³ 100% 100% 100%
Dust – coverage rate (%) 100% 100% 100%
NOx – coverage rate (%) 100% 100% 100%
SOx – coverage rate (%) 100% 100% 100%
VOC/THC – coverage rate (%) 98% 96% 96%
PCDD/F – coverage rate (%) 93% 85% 83%
Hg – coverage rate (%) 97% 98% 96%
HM1 – coverage rate (%) 96% 98% 96%
HM2 – coverage rate (%) 97% 98% 91%
Dust – specific emissions (g/tonne clinker) 58 44 38
NOx – specific emissions (g/tonne clinker) 1,734 1,483 1,394
SOx – specific emissions (g/tonne clinker) 723 667 687
VOC/THC – specific emissions (g/tonne clinker) 63 54 118
PCDD/F – specific emissions (μg/tonne clinker) 0.10 0.12 0.02
Hg – specific emissions (mg/tonne clinker) 12 8 11
HM1 – specific emissions (mg/tonne clinker) 22 14 19
HM2 – specific emissions (mg/tonne clinker) 889 688 475
Dust – absolute emissions (tonne/year) 1,318 1,041 1,122
NOx – absolute emissions (tonne/year) 39,186 35,385 41,150
SOx – absolute emissions (tonne/year) 16,330 15,918 20,282
VOC/THC – absolute emissions (tonne/year) 1,413 1,298 3,473
PCDD/F – absolute emissions (mg/year) 2,239 2,866 541
Hg – absolute emissions (kg/year) 274 200 311
HM1 – absolute emissions (kg/year) 500 324 564
HM2 – absolute emissions (kg/year) 20,079 16,407 14,022

Scope: Global
¹Includes only cement business.
²KPI1: Monitoring of all pollutants mentioned in the emissions guidelines.
³KPI2:Monitoring of PM, NOx and SOx. HM1: Cadmium and Thallium. HM2: Antimony, Arsenic, Lead, Chromium, Cobalt, Copper, Manganese, Nickel, Vanadium.

Local impact on land and communities
2019 2020 2021
Sites with existing community engagement plans (%)¹ 41.0% 33.4% 46.1%
Sites with existing mine rehabilitation plans (%)² 93.1% 93.7% 91.1%
Operational sites owned, leased, managed in, or adjacent to, protected areas and areas of high biodiversity, as specified by GRI 304-1 ² 12 11 10
Mines with high biodiversity value in which biodiversity management plans are actively implemented (%)² 58.3% 72.7% 80.0%

¹ Scope: Global
² Scope: VCBR, VCNA, VCEAA

Specific water consumption
2019 2020 2021
Total water consumed (liters) per tonne of cement produced¹ 334 340 370
Total water consumed (liters) per m³ of concrete produced² 350 612 533

¹Scope: Global
²Scope: VCBR and Uruguai

Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB)

SASB indicators are intended for use in communicating with investors about sustainability issues that are likely to affect the corporate ability to generate long-term value.
SASB
EM-CM-110a.1: Direct CO2 emissions
Cement 2019 2020 2021
Gross absolute CO2 emission (tCO2) 19,027,609 20,421,293 24,877,550
Net absolute CO2 emission (tCO2) 18,280,538 19,630,033 23,999,550
Gross specific CO2 emission (kg CO2/t cementitious) 615.3 599.5 619.2
Net specific CO2 emission (kg CO2/t cementitious) 591.1 576.2 597.4
Aggregates 2019 2020 2021
Absolute CO2 emission (tCO2e) 4,943 5,199 5,168
Specific CO2 emission (kgCO2e/t aggregates) 1.3 1.6 1.7
Concrete 2019 2020 2021
Absolute CO2 emission (tCO2e) 16,430 20,455 19,007
Specific CO2 emission (kgCO2e/t concrete) 9.2 11.2 9.4
Mortar 2019 2020 2021
Absolute CO2 emission (tCO2e) 1,853 1,674 1,563
Specific CO2 emission (kgCO2e/t mortar) 2.6 2.4 2.0
Lime and agricultural inputs 2019 2020 2021
Absolute CO2 emission (tCO2e) 156,781 184,422 194,582
Specific CO2 emission (kgCO2e/t aggregates) 75.5 87.8 89.1
Total – Scope 1 19,207,615 20,633,043 25,097,870
Biogenic emissions – Scope 1 (tCO2) 1,189,082 1,322,731 1,524,961

Scope 1 emissions include cement operations in Brazil, VCNA, VCEAA and VCLATAM through a consolidation approach. Emissions from the Cement business were calculated considering the GCCA guidelines for calculating the sector’s CO2 emissions. Emissions from other businesses were calculated considering the guidelines of the Brazilian GHG Protocol Program. The gases included in the calculation for scope 1 were: CO2, CH4, N2O. ¹Increase due to a change in scope and the acquisition of two new cement operations (McInnis and Balboa), which are still at a lower level of thermal substitution and clinker factor, in addition to reduced thermal substitution in some regions due to limited access to waste caused by the pandemic in a time of increased cement production.

EM-CM-120a.1: Other air emissions
2019 2020 2021
Number of kilns reported 35 36 39
NOx 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (tonne/year) 39,186 35,385 41,150
Specific emissions (g/tonne clinker) 1,734 1,483 1,394
SOx 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (tonne/year) 16,330 15,918 20,282
Specific emissions (g/tonne clinker) 723 667 687
PM (Dust) 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (tonne /year) 1,318 1,041 1,122
Specific emissions (g/tonne clinker) 58 44 38
Mercury 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (kg/year) 274 200 311
Specific emissions (mg/tonne clinker) 12 8 11
VOC 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (ton/year) 1,413 1,298 3,473
Specific emissions (g/tonne clinker) 63 54 118
Dioxins/Furans 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (mg/year) 2,239 2,866 541
Specific emissions (μg/tonne clinker) 0.10 0.12 0.02
HM1¹ 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (kg/year) 500 324 564
Specific emissions (mg/tonne clinker) 22 14 19
HM2² 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (kg/year) 20,079 16,407 14,022
Specific emissions (mg/tonne clinker) 889 688 475
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)³ 2019 2020 2021
Absolute emissions (tonne/year) 80
Specific emissions (g/tonne clinker) 0.01
Monitoring data
Overall coverage rate (KPI1) 90% 85% 82%
Coverage rate continuous measurement (KPI2) 100% 100% 100%

Scope: Global
¹HM1: Cadmium and Thallium.
²HM2: Antimony, Arsenic, Lead, Chromium, Cobalt, Copper, Manganese, Nickel, Vanadium.
³Setor average in Spain, extrapolated to Tunisia, Morocco and Turkey.
In 2021, we had an increase in emissions in some of the parameters, as result of three factors: higher number of kilns in operation in 2021, compared to 2020;
significant increase in clinker production; and significantly higher rate of waste co-processing.
KPI1: Monitoring of all pollutants mentioned in the emissions guidelines.
KPI2: Monitoring of PM, NOx and SOx.

EM-CM-130a.1: Energy consumption inside the organization
Non-renewable sources (GJ) 2019 2020 2021
Cement 71.774.692 75.249.280 95.601.831
Aggregates 72.528 77.412 71.983
Concrete 220.278 220.288 254.853
Mortar 12.254 11.785 15.206
Limes and agricultural inputs 29.427 24.900 24.328
Total 72.109.178 75.583.666 95.968.201
Renewable sources (GJ) 2019 2020 2021
Cement 8.593.891 10.244.265 12.857.184
Aggregates 9.283 11.049 9.079
Concrete 32.274 36.073 35.518
Mortar 6.927 15.090 33.999
Limes and agricultural inputs 2.040.042 1.695.075 1.759.473
Total 10.682.417 12.001.552 14.695.253
Electricity (MWh) 2019 2020 2021
Cement 3.422.937 3.707.824 4.242.316
Aggregates 10.294 4.368 8.943
Concrete 3.067 3.086 3.394
Mortar 7.928 7.601 8.544
Limes and agricultural inputs 47.561 50.094 50.096
Total 3.491.786 3.772.973 4.313.292
Total consumption (GJ) 2019 2020 2021
Cement 92.691.154 98.841.710 123.731.351
Aggregates 118.870 104.187 113.256
Concreto 263.591 267.470 302.590
Mortar 47.721 54.238 79.963
Limes and agricultural inputs 2.240.690 1.900.314 1.964.147
Total 95.362.025 101.167.919 126.191.306

Scope: all VCBR operations and VCEAA, VCNA and VCLATAM cement operations.

EM-CM-130a.1: Energy Management
2019 2020 2021
Grid electricity (%) 79.2% 81.8% 84.3%
Renewable Energy (fuel + electricity) (%) 13.9% 14.3% 13.6%
Alternative fuels (%) 22.6% 23.8% 22.4%
Renewable energy (electricity) (%) 18.5%

Scope: all VCBR operations and VCEAA, VCNA and VCLATAM cement operations

EM-CM-140a.1: Water withdrawn by source
2019 2020 2021
Water withdrawn – Cement (megaliter) All areas Areas with water stress All areas Areas with water stress All areas Areas with water stress
Surface water 11,763 6,372 13,110 5,978 13,107 6,080
Groundwater 1,750 817 1,054 177 2818 221
Rainwater 5.7 0.0 14.4 0.9 43.4 0.2
Produced water 31,213 24,804 39,663 16,806 41,496 14,954
Third-party water 233 157 363 138 258 196
Total 44,965 32,150 54,205 23,099 57,723 21,451
2019 2020 2021
Water withdrawn – Concrete (megaliter) All areas Areas with water stress All areas Areas with water stress All areas Areas with water stress
Surface water 0 0 0 0 9 0
Groundwater 321 0 1,002 0 1,042 0
Rainwater 0 0 0 0 0 0
Produced water 0 0 0 0 0 0
Third-party water 334 0 155 0 164 0
Total 655 0 1,157 0 1,214 0

¹ Scope: Global.
² Scope: VCBR and Bolivia.
The data was obtained by measurement and estimative. Water stress analysis was performed using the Aqueduct tool.

EM-CM-150a.1: Waste management
2019 2020 2021
Amount of waste generated (tonne) 60,333 152,500 101,313
Hazardous (%) 8.2% 9.3% 3.7%
Recycled (%) 27.1% 27.5% 61.7%

Scope: Global

EM-CM-320a.1: Occupational health and safety
Work-related injuries – Company employees  2019 2020 2021
Fatalities 0 1 0
Rate of fatalities 0.00 0.87 0.00
Number of High-consequence accidents (excluding fatalities) ¹ 4 0 1
Rate of High-consequence accidents (excluding fatalities) ¹ 0.17 0.00 0.04
Number of injuries ² 42 25 33
Rate of lost-time injuries ² 1.83 1.11 1.30
Severity rate 232.16 67.71 63.11
Number of hours worked 22,915,653 22,478,029 25,382,557
Work-related injuries – Contractors  2019 2020 2021
Fatalities 1 0 0
Rate of fatalities 0.05 0.00 0.00
Number of High-consequence accidents (excluding fatalities) ¹ 1 1 1
Rate of High-consequence accidents (excluding fatalities) ¹ 0.05 0.06 0.04
Number of injuries ² 13 20 22
Rate of lost-time injuries ² 0.60 1.17 0.93
Severity rate 19.88 36.66 42.62
Number of hours worked 21,625,476 17,102,640 23,720,780
Total work-related accident rate (employees + contractors) 1.23 1.14 1.12
Near accidents – employees + contractors 11,079
Near miss frequency rate (NMFR) (employees + contractors) ³ 45.13

Scope: Global. Figures do not include Uruguay operations, except for number of fatalities.
¹The number and rate of high-consequence accidents include amputations or six-month leave of absence and exclude deaths.
²The number and rate of accidents consider only lost-time incidents.
³ The rate of near accidents was calculated based on 2,000,000 hours worked.

Other rates were calculated based on 1,000,000 hours worked. Among employees, the main work-related injuries involve the ankles, feet, hands and fingers, and include sprains and fractures. The greatest risks for high-consequence injuries are dangerous energies, moving and rotating parts, high temperatures, possibility of hot flour leakage, movement of machines and equipment, lifting of loads and activities at height and in confined spaces. These risks are determined after a systematic study of the processes and assessment of the hazards and risks involved.

EM-CM-320a.2: Health
2021
Number of reported cases of silicosis 0

Scope: VCBR

EM-CM-410a.1: Financial revenue through sustainable solutions
2021
Financial revenue through sustainable solutions ¹ (%) 24.8%

Scope: VCBR, VCNA, VCEAA
¹ products and/or services that mitigate our environmental footprint or offer environmental benefits compared to traditional options

EM-CM-520a.1: Competition
2019 2020 2021 
Total number of legal actions for unfair competition, trust and monopoly Practices ¹ 2 2 4
Value of legal actions (R$ million) 6,100 6,344 7,754

Scope: Global
¹Considers only legal actions above R$ 98 million, in line with the standards applied for M&A and Due Diligence.

EM-CM-000.A: Production by major product line
2019 2020 2021
Sales of cement (million metric tons) 29.9 32.4 37.2
Sales of aggregates (million metric tons) 21.7 22.7 24.4
Sales of concrete (million m³) 6.8 7.1 8.1
Sales of mortar (million metric tons) 1.5 1.5 1.6

Scope: Global (cement, aggregates, and concrete) and VCBR (mortar).